Installing Chain Link Fence

Installing Chain Link Fence

TONY DULLEY More than 1 year ago How big were the yards in those price ranges?  Terry Mey More than 1 year ago  Chain-link fence is also come in different thickneses of wire or “gauges” this also effect the cost of materials  gail kiser More than 1 year ago you were so right about the invisible pet fences not working at crucial times. I lost three dogs due to there collars not working , or running straight thru the line chasing another animal or the main computer going down. Really wished I had paid the extra money for chain link instead. james roy More than 1 year ago very helpful and appreciated the cost analysis. Roberta Jackson More than 1 year ago This was great information. I feel that I know the questions to ask with this project! Tamie Smith 9 months ago The article could have been better if it had inclued exactly what questions to ask,  in the ask a lot of questions paragraph as well as explaining the different types of chain link fencing materials available for residential use – with the the pro’s and cons of each type. It would have been helpful to have a paragraph on the average cost of a few of the most common fenced in area sizes so when the customer calls for a quote, he knows that the quote given,  is in the ballpark as far as cost. And listing the step by step process and average lenght of time to complete each stage would have helped the customer know if the fence installer is “watching the paint dry”. kim cross More than 1 year ago great information. thank-you Nick Messina More than 1 year ago Thanks for the info. Kathleen Gilroy. More than 1 year ago I appreciate the information on hidden costs. Carol McGovern 9 months ago One ide of yard, 100 or 120 deep Lori Lambrecht More than 1 year ago wondering how big the yards were in the estimates given. Megan Hines More than 1 year ago Thanks for all the thoughts! Gerard Caporale More than 1 year ago Great info thanks P Kenny More than 1 year ago Thanks for the info RITA HOLLOWAY More than 1 year ago Good info.  Very helpful. Carol Flanagan More than 1 year ago Check zoning regs. I want an 8 ft fence but zoning allows only 6 ft. Also, I’ve found that labor is very much more than the cost of materials. You are paying for the expertise and experience. It’s worth it when you get the right company. Linda Gottschalk More than 1 year ago Good information.  I know what questions to ask. emilio abella More than 1 year ago thank u for this info big help for us to make decisions for our projects. Jason Lincoln More than 1 year ago Very helpful with the cost analysis Joelene Cheshire More than 1 year ago Thanks for the information, we are wanting a fence to contain pets and allow them to get fresh air  and exercise at the same time.  Had a bad experience with the neighbor’s dog attacking my daughter’s men pen.   marilyn kunzog More than 1 year ago Thanks for all the info on “hidden” costs to ask contractor. Helen Barto More than 1 year ago Thanks for the information.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

A chain-link fence is an inexpensive way to enclose any sized area for safety or security. Unlike solid fencing, chain-link’s open weave design lets people see through the fence, while still serving as a barrier to unauthorized entry. Here are the steps to installing a chain-link fence.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

Preparing Fence Layout Use the following steps to lay out your chain-link fence. Good to KnowBefore beginning any excavation, check for underground utilities. Dial 811 for a national directory of utility companies. Step 1 Locate your property’s boundary lines. It’s recommended that all posts be set approximately 4 inches inside the property line so that concrete footings don’t encroach onto any adjoining property. Step 2 Measure the overall length of your planned fence to determine how many feet of chain-link fabric and top rail will be required (Fig. 1). Step 3 Mark the location of each terminal post (corner, end and gateposts are called terminal posts) with a stake. When determining the positions of gateposts, remember that clearance for hinges, latches, etc., is included in the listed opening width of the gate. Therefore, if you ordered a gate for a 36-inch opening, the post spacing should be exactly 36 inches, inside post face to inside post face.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

Stretching Fence Fabric Step 1 Temporarily insert a tension bar about 3 feet inside the unattached end of fabric. Securely fasten one end of the fence stretcher to the tension bar and the other end to the terminal post (Fig. 17). Stretch the fabric. The correct fabric tension should allow a slight amount of give when squeezed by hand. Remove the temporary tension bar. Step 2 Adjust the fabric to the exact length by adding or removing wire as shown in figures 15 and 16. Insert a tension bar at the end of the fabric and connect it to the tension bands on the terminal post. If the top of the chain-link fabric doesn’t create a right angle to the terminal post, the fabric must be cut on a bias so that the tension bar can slide into the fabric at the proper angle. Pull the chain-link fabric until the top or the bottom, whichever is shortest, reaches the terminal post. The other corner of the fabric will extend past the terminal post. Insert the tension bar at an angle through the fabric parallel to the terminal post (Fig. 18). Step 3 Remove the excess wire by cutting the strands that form the diamond at the tension bar, leaving them long enough to bend over the bar. Don’t cut every wire. The number of wires cut depends on the degree of slope and the height of the fence.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

Slide tension bands onto each post. Tension bands secure the chain-link mesh to the posts. Use one less tension band than the height of the fence, in feet. For example, if the fence is 4-feet high, use 3 tension bands per post. For a 6-foot fence, use 5 bands, and so on. The long, flat surface of the tension band should face toward the outside of the fence.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

Step 1 Temporarily insert a tension bar about 3 feet inside the unattached end of fabric. Securely fasten one end of the fence stretcher to the tension bar and the other end to the terminal post (Fig. 17). Stretch the fabric. The correct fabric tension should allow a slight amount of give when squeezed by hand. Remove the temporary tension bar. Step 2 Adjust the fabric to the exact length by adding or removing wire as shown in figures 15 and 16. Insert a tension bar at the end of the fabric and connect it to the tension bands on the terminal post. If the top of the chain-link fabric doesn’t create a right angle to the terminal post, the fabric must be cut on a bias so that the tension bar can slide into the fabric at the proper angle. Pull the chain-link fabric until the top or the bottom, whichever is shortest, reaches the terminal post. The other corner of the fabric will extend past the terminal post. Insert the tension bar at an angle through the fabric parallel to the terminal post (Fig. 18). Step 3 Remove the excess wire by cutting the strands that form the diamond at the tension bar, leaving them long enough to bend over the bar. Don’t cut every wire. The number of wires cut depends on the degree of slope and the height of the fence.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

A chain link fence is made up of three primary elements: posts, rolls of chain link and gates. The first step is to plan the layout of your fence. This includes not only where the primary corner posts are, but also where you plan to put the gates. Corner and gate posts are commonly called terminal posts.
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Installing Chain Link Fence

Tips Chain-link fence can also be attached to wooden posts and rails. In those cases, no end caps, loop caps or rail caps are used. To provide privacy with a chain link fence, thread thin, flexible wooden or plastic slats diagonally through the mesh. Privacy slats are available in a variety of colors at most hardware stores and home centers. If the ground slopes up or down at your gate’s location, set the gate posts to follow the grade. Use quick-setting cement for faster installation.
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Chain-link fence can also be attached to wooden posts and rails. In those cases, no end caps, loop caps or rail caps are used. To provide privacy with a chain link fence, thread thin, flexible wooden or plastic slats diagonally through the mesh. Privacy slats are available in a variety of colors at most hardware stores and home centers. If the ground slopes up or down at your gate’s location, set the gate posts to follow the grade. Use quick-setting cement for faster installation.
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Chain link fences have been used for a long time in many different applications. They are used in steel cage matches in professional wrestling. They can also be used for baseball field backstops. This gives the baseball hitter a mark to aim for. They need to hit it over this fence to score a home run. What all of these uses have in common is that they require different lengths and sizing. A wrestling match cage will need to be much higher than a baseball backstop, although it will need less feet than a backstop. A backstop will need to be much longer but still have some height to it. This information, in addition to labor costs, can really drive up the chain link fence prices, depending on the company.